Saturday, September 22, 2018
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Life of the Party

Ocean’s 8 is making out like a bandit.

Warner Bros’. female-led heist movie is on track to debut with about $41.5 million in ticket sales from 4,145 theaters in the U.S. and Canada this weekend, easily dethroning two-time box office champ Solo: A Star Wars Story and holding off fellow newcomers Hereditary and Hotel Artemis.

That figure represents a solid start for Ocean’s 8, toward the higher end of industry projections, and it’s the biggest opening of the Ocean’s franchise, not adjusted for inflation. (Ocean’s 11, 12, and 13 bowed with $38.1 million, $39.2 million, and $36.1 million in 2001, 2004, and 2007.) Time will tell if the series’ fourth installment can match or exceed the global success of its predecessors, which combined to earn more than $1 billion at the worldwide box office. Through Sunday, Ocean’s 8 will have grossed about $12.2 million overseas.

Putting a gender-swapped spin on the Ocean’s movies, which were previously led by George Clooney and Brad Pitt, the latest installment stars Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Sarah Paulson, Awkwafina, Rihanna, and Helena Bonham Carter as a crew of swindlers who plot a major job at the Met Gala in New York City. Gary Ross (The Hunger Games) directed the film, taking the reins from Steven Soderbergh.

Critics’ reviews were mixed to positive, while moviegoers gave Ocean’s 8 a B-plus CinemaScore. The audience on opening weekend was 69 percent female.

Taking second and third place this weekend are two other franchise-extending movies: Disney and Lucasfilm’s Star Wars spinoff Solo, with about $15.2 million, and Fox’s superhero sequel Deadpool 2, with about $13.7 million.

Those numbers bring Solo to a domestic total of $176.1 million after 17 days in theaters, and Deadpool 2 to  $278.7 after 17 days.

Hereditary
Pictured: Toni Collette
A24

Cracking the top four is A24’s buzzed-about horror movie Hereditary, with an estimated $13 million from 2,964 screens. That doubles industry forecasts and marks the biggest opening weekend ever for for the indie studio.

Written and directed by Ari Aster, the film stars Toni Collette as a woman whose family is haunted after her mother dies. Hereditary received a dismal D-plus CinemaScore, but critics gave it glowing reviews.

This weekend’s other newcomer, the Global Road action thriller Hotel Artemis, arrives with about $3.2 million from 2,407 theaters, good for the No. 8 spot. Drew Pearce wrote and directed the movie, which stars Jodie Foster as a nurse running a secret hospital for criminals in near-future Los Angeles. The cast also includes Sterling K. Brown, Sofia Boutella, and Brian Tyree Henry. Reviews were mixed, and audiences gave it a C-minus CinemaScore.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 4.3 percent year-to-date. Check out the June 8-10 figures below.

1. Ocean’s 8 — $41.5 million
2. Solo: A Star Wars Story — $15.2 million
3. Deadpool 2 — $13.7 million
4. Hereditary — $13 million
5. Avengers: Infinity War — $6.8 million
6. Adrift — $5.1 million
7. Book Club — $4.2 million
8. Hotel Artemis — $3.2 million
9. Upgrade — $2.2 million
10. Life of the Party — $2.1 million

Business isn’t exactly booming for the galaxy’s favorite space smuggler this Memorial Day weekend.

Disney and Lucasfilm’s Han Solo origin tale Solo: A Star Wars Story is on track to earn about $101 million in ticket sales from 4,381 theaters in the U.S. and Canada over the four-day holiday weekend — easily topping the box office, but coming in well below the $130 million-$150 million previously projected by Disney.

After earning $14.1 million from Thursday night previews, a pre-Memorial Day record, Solo appears to be stalling, and its estimated Friday-Sunday gross of $83.3 million falls considerably short of Rogue One ($155.1 million), let alone The Last Jedi ($220 million) and The Force Awakens ($248 million). Solo’s three-day overseas take — about $65 million, from 88 percent of its foreign markets, including China — is also underwhelming.

Marking the 10th film in the Star Wars saga and the second “anthology” movie, Solo explores the younger years of Han Solo, the interstellar scoundrel originated by Harrison Ford. Alden Ehrenreich plays the title role, joined by Emilia Clarke as first love Qi’ra, Joonas Suotamo as trusty sidekick Chewbacca, and Donald Glover as fellow rogue Lando Calrissian. Reviews have been mixed to positive, while audiences gave it an A-minus CinemaScore. It’s the only Star Wars movie of the Disney era not to receive an A.

Solo reportedly cost upward of $250 million to make, partly because original directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller were replaced by Ron Howard, who reshot significant portions of the film.

Solo also comes as the fourth Star Wars movie in less than three years, and its soft opening might be a sign of franchise fatigue. Nevertheless, Disney has Episode IX on the calendar for Dec. 20, 2019, and is mulling standalone movies about Boba Fett, Lando, and Obi-Wan Kenobi.

Twentieth Century Fox

Taking second place this weekend is Fox’s Deadpool 2, with an estimated three-day gross of $42.7 million ($53.5 million through Monday). That figure represents a rather steep decline of 66 percent in its second frame, and brings its domestic total to $207.4 million after 10 days in theaters.

Superheroes will also claim the No. 3 spot, as Disney and Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War adds about $16.5 million to its domestic haul in its fifth week.

Rounding out the top five are Paramount’s rom-com Book Club, with about $9.5 million, and Warner Bros.’ back-to-school farce Life of the Party, with about $5.1 million. Further down the list, Magnolia Pictures’ Ruth Bader Ginsburg documentary RBG will rejoin the top 10 with an estimated $1.2 million in its fourth weekend, in just 415 theaters.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 7.7 percent year-to-date. Check out the May 25-27 figures below.

1. Solo: A Star Wars Story — $83.3 million ($101 million four-day)
2. Deadpool 2 — $42.7 million ($53.5 million four-day)
3. Avengers: Infinity War — $16.5 million ($20.1 million four-day)
4. Book Club — $9.5 million ($12 million four-day)
5. Life of the Party — $5.1 million ($6.5 million four-day)
6. Breaking In — $4.1 million
7. Show Dogs — $3.1 million
8. Overboard — $3 million
9. A Quiet Place — $2.2 million
10. RBG — $1.2 million

This weekend, Ryan Reynolds is the Merc With the Money.

The actor’s wisecracking superhero sequel Deadpool 2 is on track to open with an estimated $125 million in ticket sales from 4,349 theaters in the U.S. and Canada, unseating three-time box office champ Avengers: Infinity War and scoring the second-highest debut ever for an R-rated movie.

Though that’s no small feat, Deadpool 2 will fall short of industry projections, which had it in the $130 million to $150 million range, and the original Deadpool, which bowed with $132.4 million in February 2016 (thus setting the R-rated opening record). Overseas, the sequel will add about $176.3 million this weekend, for a worldwide total of about $301.3 million.

Directed by David Leitch, from a script by Reynolds, Rhett Reese, and Paul Wernick, Deadpool 2 finds the titular antihero (played by Reynolds) protecting a young mutant from a time-traveling tough guy named Cable (Josh Brolin), while gleefully skewering Hollywood’s obsession with superheroes. The cast also includes Julian Dennison, Morena Baccarin, Zazie Beetz, T.J. Miller, and Brianna Hildebrand, plus a host of celebrity cameos.

The Fox film, which cost about $110 million to make, received generally positive reviews from critics (on par with the first film), and audiences gave it an A CinemaScore, suggesting good word-of-mouth prospects.

Disney’s rival Marvel movie Avengers: Infinity War drops down to second place this weekend, grossing a still-solid $28.7 million in its fourth frame and bringing its domestic total to $595 million. The film will add about $84.4 million overseas, pushing its worldwide total north of $1.8 billion.

Melinda Sue Gordon/Paramount Pictures

The weekend’s other new wide releases are Paramount’s rom-com Book Club and Open Road’s family-friendly comedy Show Dogs. The former film will take in about $12.5 million, good for the No. 3 spot, while the latter will gross about $6 million, landing in sixth place.

Directed by Bill Holderman, Book Club stars Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen, and Mary Steenburgen as four friends whose love lives are upended when they decide to read the guilty pleasure Fifty Shades of Grey.

Show Dogs, meanwhile, centers on a police dog (voiced by Chris “Ludacris” Bridges) who goes undercover at a dog show with his human partner (Will Arnett) to stop an animal smuggling ring. Raja Gosnell directed.

Both movies garnered lackluster reviews, though audiences gave them solid A-minus CinemaScores.

Rounding out the top five are the Melissa McCarthy comedy Life of the Party, with about $7.7 million, and the Gabrielle Union thriller Breaking In, with about $6.5 million.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 6.3 percent year-to-date. Check out the May 18-20 figures below.

1. Deadpool 2 — $125 million
2. Avengers: Infinity War — $28.7 million
3. Book Club — $12.5 million
4. Life of the Party — $7.7 million
5. Breaking In — $6.5 million
6. Show Dogs — $6 million
7. Overboard — $4.7 million
8. A Quiet Place — $4 million
9. Rampage — $1.5 million
10. I Feel Pretty — $1.2 million

Ryan Reynolds and 20th Century Fox’s superhero sequel opens two years after the first ‘Deadpool’ hit theaters.

Avengers: Infinity War finally has some competition.

Ryan Reynolds and 20th Century Fox’s summer event pic Deadpool 2 rocketed to a huge $18.6 million in Thursday-night previews from 3,785 theaters, a record for an R-rated pic.

The previous record holder was It ($13.5 million). Prior to It, the first Deadpool had boasted the top preview gross for an R-rated film ($12.7 million). Deadpool, opening in February 2016, went on to debut to a massive $132.4 million, the best launch ever for an R-rated film.

Deadpool 2 — a darling among critics — seems destined to make some history of its own, if the preview number is an indication.

On Friday morning, Deadpool 2 will be playing in a total of 4,349 theaters in North America, where it will easily win the weekend with a debut in the $130 million to $150 million range, ending Infinity War‘s three-week rule.

Overseas, Deadpool 2 is opening in most major markets timed to its U.S. launch — one major exception is China — for a projected foreign debut of $150 million-plus.

Reynolds reprises his role as Deadpool in the follow-up. He produced the sequel and co-wrote the script with his Deadpool collaborators Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick.

Deadpool 2, directed by David Leitch, follows the irreverent superhero as he forms an X-Force posse in hopes of stopping the evil Cable (Josh Brolin). Morena Baccarin, Julian Dennison, Zazie Beetz, T.J. Miller, Brianna Hildebrand and Jack Kesy co-star.

A pair of smaller films also open nationwide this week: Paramount’s female-fronted Book Club and Global Road’s family offering Show Dogs.

Targeting older femmes, director Bill Holderman’s Book Club stars Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen as four friends who decide to read Fifty Shades of Grey — with unintended consequences.

Craig T. Nelson, Andy Garcia and Don Johnson play the love interests. Book Club is tracking to open in the $9 million-$10 million range after grossing a respectable $625,000 in Thursday-evening previews. That’s on par with such pics as Sisters, Overboard and The Intern.

While Avengers: Infinity War will continue its impressive box office run this weekend, perhaps topping $600 million domestically, it will be relinquishing its spot at the top of the domestic charts to yet another Marvel comic book adaptation. Fox’s Deadpool 2 is debuting in a record number of theaters for an R-rated release, not to mention serving as the studio’s widest release ever, and hopes to top the record R-rated debut set by its predecessor two years ago. Also opening this weekend is Paramount’s Book Club, looking to offer older audience members an alternative, while Global Road debuts an alternative of its own in the talking dog family feature Show Dogs.

With Deadpool 2 expected to top this weekend’s box office, it will be the ninth weekend out of the twenty so far this year that a Marvel comic adaptation has served as the #1 film at the weekend box office. Debuting in 4,349 locations, the film is the widest release ever for an R-rated film (topping It‘s 4,103 theaters) and the widest release ever for 20th Century Fox, topping the 4,253 theaters How to Train Your Dragon 2 debuted in in June 2014. The size of the film’s footprint says a lot about the audience and exhibitor appetite for the foul-mouthed antihero as it takes aim at topping the first film’s record-setting $132.4 million opening for an R-rated film.

Industry expectations for the film lean toward an opening anywhere from $130-150 million and those numbers are supported when looking at IMDb page view comparisons leading up to release. Most importantly, Deadpool 2 is neck-and-neck with the first film, which isn’t typically the case for a sequel as follow-ups tend to pace behind their predecessors. Additionally, online ticket retailer Fandango.com reports the sequel is outpacing the original film in advanced ticket sales, all of which has us leaning toward a record breaking opening for an R-rated film with a $138 million opening with room to go much higher.

After three weeks on top of the domestic box office and already pulling in over $1.686 billion worldwide, becoming the fourth largest global release of all-time, Avengers: Infinity War will fall to second place on the domestic charts this weekend. Right now we’re anticipating a drop right around 53%, pulling in around $29 million for the three-day, finishing the weekend with a domestic cume just shy of $600 million domestically after 24 days in release.

Paramount is looking at a third place debut for Book Club, which they acquired North America, France and UK rights for $10 million at AFM last November. Starring Jane Fonda, Mary Steenburgen, Diane Keaton and Candice Bergen, the studio is being conservative with its expectations, anticipating an opening right at $9 million, below our anticipated $10-14 million range for the weekend.

Our expectations are supported by IMDb page view comparisons, which show Book Club outperforming films such as The Big Wedding, The Single Moms Club, Going in Style and Love the Coopers over the two weeks leading up to release while pacing behind Nancy Meyers‘s The Intern. All things considered, our data is leaning heavily toward an opening closer to $12 million, give or take a million or so on either side of that number.

Melissa McCarthy is coming off her worst debut as a film’s lead in Life of the Party, which only managed to narrowly top Breaking In last weekend once actuals were counted. This weekend we’re expecting it to dip 47% for a three-day right around $9.5 million and a fourth place finish.

Rounding out the top five is the aforementioned Breaking In, which came in $1.1 million ahead of estimates last weekend and should dip around 58% or so for a $7.4 million weekend, pushing the film’s domestic cume over $30 million after ten days in release.

Just outside the top five we find the weekend’s final new wide release in Global Road’s Show Dogs. The talking dog feature is the last film to come from the old regime, prior to the Open Road and IM Global merger, and reports have the film tracking to debut in the high single million digits. To look at IMDb page view data we are seeing this one pacing almost exactly like Open Road’s The Nut Job 2 last August, which opened in a massive 4,003 theaters with a dismal $8.3 million. While there haven’t been many family options in theaters as of late, we’re still struggling to see Show Dogs breaking out and currently expecting the film to debut with anywhere from $6-8 million with our forecast, at this time, coming in on the lower end of those expectations.

Magnolia is expanding the release of their documentary RBG into 375 locations (+196) this weekend. The film squeaked into the top ten last weekend and could do the same this weekend. Right now we’re forecasting it will be neck-and-neck with I Feel Pretty for that final spot, both finishing right around $1.5 million for the three-day.

Also be on the lookout for Focus’s documentary Pope Francis – A Man of His Word, which is opening in 346 locations and should manage around $1-1.2 million this weekend, enough to threaten for a spot in the top 15.

In limited release, A24 is releasing the thriller First Reformed into four theaters; Bleecker will debut On Chesil Beach in four locations; and IFC will release the documentary That Summer into one theater.

This weekend’s forecast is directly below. This post will be updated on Friday morning with Thursday night preview results followed by Friday estimates on Saturday morning, and a complete weekend recap on Sunday morning.

  • Deadpool 2 (4,349 theaters) – $138.0 M
  • Avengers: Infinity War (4,002 theaters) – $29.2 M
  • Book Club (2,781 theaters) – $12.0 M
  • Life of the Party (3,656 theaters) – $9.5 M
  • Breaking In (2,537 theaters) – $7.4 M
  • Show Dogs (3,145 theaters) – $6.3 M
  • Overboard (1,820 theaters) – $5.8 M
  • A Quiet Place (2,327 theaters) – $4.0 M
  • Rampage (1,466 theaters) – $1.6 M
  • RBG (375 theaters) – $1.5 M

Hopper Stone SMPSP/ Warner Bros.

Life of the Party (2018)

Type: Movie; Genre: Comedy; Release date: 05/11/18′ Performer: Melissa McCarthy, Gillian Jacobs, Maya Rudolph, Julie Bowen; Director: Ben Falcone; MPAA: PG-13

Like Rodney Dangerfield in an Ogilvy home perm and a needlepoint Proud Mom sweater, Melissa McCarthy is going back to school. She will find a nice oaky chardonnay at a frat party; bake a lovely homemade lasagna for her daughter’s self-doubting sorority sisters; and yes, maybe bang a 22-year-old in the library stacks until he calls her his “sexual Dumbledore.”

That’s about 90 percent of the premise for McCarthy’s latest big-screen vehicle — a vaguely movie-shaped casing designed to contain, more or less, her loopy one-woman-band brand of comedy. If that’s your bag (and her metaphorical duffel feels a lot roomier at this point than, say, Adam Sandler’s) Life of the Party is a charming and generally painless way to spend two hours. It’s not nearly as sharp as some of the best stuff she’s done, but it’s pointedly kinder too, wrapping even its nastiest characters — including a pair of sneering, crop-topped Mean Girls — in a cozy Slanket of forgiveness.

McCarthy stars as Deanna, a blithe fortysomething housewife whose only child, Maddie (Molly Gordon) is about to start her senior year at the fictional Decatur University. Deanna doesn’t know that her husband, Dan (Veep’s Matt Walsh), a dour tightwad with a droopy dad mustache, is about to make his own life change; he’s fallen in love with a local real estate agent (Julie Bowen) and decided to “upgrade,” effective immediately.

Blindsided but encouraged to move on by her best friend (Maya Rudolph), Deanna decides to finish the degree she abandoned more than 20 years ago when she got pregnant with Maddie. That means moving into a dorm room with a heavy-lidded agoraphobe (SNL’s Heidi Gardner, so dry she’s a sand dune), getting to know her daughter’s friends (including Gillian Jacobs as an eccentric older student whose college career was waylaid by an eight-year coma), and rediscovering the joy of coed hookups (with Luke Benward, a sweet golden biscuit of a boy).

Somewhere too, will come the obligatory makeover scene, an ’80s-themed dance-off, and several life lessons on the importance of friendship and self-esteem and finding your own path. Director Ben Falcone (McCarthy’s husband and partner on previous outings Tammy and The Boss) still doesn’t quite know how to give a movie any real arc; Party doesn’t have a plot so much as a series of small episodes and improvised riffs leading toward graduation.

What it does have is its star and her sheer, loony life force — a well she’ll keep drawing from (there are at least three more projects on her production slate now) until she, or the audience, moonwalks away.

With all due respect to Melissa McCarthy and Gabrielle Union: It’s Thanos’ world, we just live in it.

In its third weekend, Disney and Marvel’s superhero blockbuster Avengers: Infinity War continues to dominate the box office, earning an estimated $61.8 million from 4,474 theaters in the U.S. and Canada while trouncing McCarthy’s new comedy Life of the Party and Union’s new thriller Breaking In.

On Saturday, Infinity War cracked the $500 million mark at the domestic box office, becoming the second-fastest film to do so, and through Sunday it will have grossed about $547.8 million. The movie also bowed in China this weekend, powering a massive $281.3 million international haul. Its worldwide total now stands at about $1.6 billion and ranks fifth all time, behind Avatar, Titanic, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and Jurassic World.

Directed by Joe and Anthony Russo and made for close to $300 million, Infinity War marks the third Avengers film and the 19th installment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It features heroes from across the MCU franchise — including Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man, Chris Evans’ Captain America, Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow, Tom Holland’s Spider-Man, and the Chris Pratt-led Guardians of the Galaxy — and pits them against Thanos (Josh Brolin), an interplanetary warlord trying to wipe out half the life in the universe.

An untitled sequel is already on the calendar for May 3, 2019.

Warner Bros. Pictures

In second place, Warner Bros’. Life of the Party will take in about $18.5 million at 3,656 domestic theaters. That figure is in line with industry projections but falls short of recent McCarthy films Tammy ($21.6 million), The Boss ($23.6 million), and Spy ($29.1 million)

Written by McCarthy and her husband, Ben Falcone, who also directed, Life of the Party centers on a middle-aged divorcée (McCarthy) who returns to college to finish her degree and winds up in class with her daughter (Molly Gordon). The film received lackluster reviews from critics, and audiences gave it a tepid B CinemaScore.

The weekend’s other new wide release, Universal’s Breaking In, is on pace to gross about $16.5 million at 2,537 theaters, good for third place. That’s a solid start for a film that cost a modest $6 million to make.

Directed by James McTeigue (V for Vendetta), the film stars Union as a mother forced to protect her kids when the mansion of her recently deceased dad is invaded by burglars. Reviews have been poor, and moviegoers gave it a B CinemaScore.

Paul Sarkis/Universal

Rounding out the top five this weekend are Lionsgate’s rom-com remake Overboard, with about $10.1 million, and Paramount’s silently spooky horror hit A Quiet Place, with about $6.4 million.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 4.8 percent year-to-date. Check out the May 11-13 figures below.

1. Avengers: Infinity War — $61.8 million
2. Life of the Party — $18.5 million
3. Breaking In — $16.5 million
4. Overboard — $10.1 million
5. A Quiet Place — $6.4 million
6. I Feel Pretty — $3.7 million
7. Rampage — $3.4 million
8. Tully — $2.2 million
9. Black Panther — $1.9 million
10. Blockers — $1.1 million

Life of the Party (2018) Movie Trailer
Watch the Trailer of this Movie:

In Theaters May 11

New Line Cinema’s comedy “Life of the Party” stars Melissa McCarthy under the direction of Ben Falcone.

When her husband suddenly dumps her, longtime dedicated housewife Deanna (McCarthy) turns regret into re-set by going back to college…landing in the same class and school as her daughter, who’s not entirely sold on the idea. Plunging headlong into the campus experience, the increasingly outspoken Deanna—now Dee Rock—embraces freedom, fun and frat boys on her own terms, finding her true self in a senior year no one ever expected.

The film also stars Gillian Jacobs (“Don’t Think Twice,” “Love,” “Community”), Maya Rudolph (“Bridesmaids,” “Sisters”), Julie Bowen (“Modern Family”), Matt Walsh (“Veep,” “Ghostbusters”), Molly Gordon (“Love the Coopers,” “Animal Kingdom”), with Stephen Root (“Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates”), and Oscar nominee Jacki Weaver (“Silver Linings Playbook,” “Animal Kingdom”), Jessie Ennis (“Better Call Saul”), Adria Arjona (“True Detective,” “Emerald City”), Debby Ryan (“Jessie”) and Jimmy O. Yang (“Silicon Valley”).

McCarthy and Falcone co-wrote the screenplay and produced through their production company, On the Day. Chris Henchy also produced the film, with Toby Emmerich, Richard Brener, Michael Disco and David Siegel serving as executive producers.

Falcone’s behind-the-scenes creative team included director of photography Julio Macat (“The Boss,” “Horrible Bosses 2,” “Daddy’s Home”); production designer Rusty Smith (“The Boss”); editor Brian Olds (“Central Intelligence”); and costume designer Louise Mingenbach (the “The Hangover” films). The music is by Fil Eisler (“How to Be Single,” “Empire”).

New Line Cinema Presents, an On the Day Production, “Life of the Party.” Slated for release on May 11, 2018, the film will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. It has been rated PG-13.



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