Friday, June 22, 2018
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deadpool 2 1 Box office: Deadpool 2 dethrones Infinity War with $125 million opening

This weekend, Ryan Reynolds is the Merc With the Money.

The actor’s wisecracking superhero sequel Deadpool 2 is on track to open with an estimated $125 million in ticket sales from 4,349 theaters in the U.S. and Canada, unseating three-time box office champ Avengers: Infinity War and scoring the second-highest debut ever for an R-rated movie.

Though that’s no small feat, Deadpool 2 will fall short of industry projections, which had it in the $130 million to $150 million range, and the original Deadpool, which bowed with $132.4 million in February 2016 (thus setting the R-rated opening record). Overseas, the sequel will add about $176.3 million this weekend, for a worldwide total of about $301.3 million.

Directed by David Leitch, from a script by Reynolds, Rhett Reese, and Paul Wernick, Deadpool 2 finds the titular antihero (played by Reynolds) protecting a young mutant from a time-traveling tough guy named Cable (Josh Brolin), while gleefully skewering Hollywood’s obsession with superheroes. The cast also includes Julian Dennison, Morena Baccarin, Zazie Beetz, T.J. Miller, and Brianna Hildebrand, plus a host of celebrity cameos.

The Fox film, which cost about $110 million to make, received generally positive reviews from critics (on par with the first film), and audiences gave it an A CinemaScore, suggesting good word-of-mouth prospects.

Disney’s rival Marvel movie Avengers: Infinity War drops down to second place this weekend, grossing a still-solid $28.7 million in its fourth frame and bringing its domestic total to $595 million. The film will add about $84.4 million overseas, pushing its worldwide total north of $1.8 billion.Book Club Box office: Deadpool 2 dethrones Infinity War with $125 million opening

Melinda Sue Gordon/Paramount Pictures

The weekend’s other new wide releases are Paramount’s rom-com Book Club and Open Road’s family-friendly comedy Show Dogs. The former film will take in about $12.5 million, good for the No. 3 spot, while the latter will gross about $6 million, landing in sixth place.

Directed by Bill Holderman, Book Club stars Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen, and Mary Steenburgen as four friends whose love lives are upended when they decide to read the guilty pleasure Fifty Shades of Grey.

Show Dogs, meanwhile, centers on a police dog (voiced by Chris “Ludacris” Bridges) who goes undercover at a dog show with his human partner (Will Arnett) to stop an animal smuggling ring. Raja Gosnell directed.

Both movies garnered lackluster reviews, though audiences gave them solid A-minus CinemaScores.

Rounding out the top five are the Melissa McCarthy comedy Life of the Party, with about $7.7 million, and the Gabrielle Union thriller Breaking In, with about $6.5 million.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 6.3 percent year-to-date. Check out the May 18-20 figures below.

1. Deadpool 2 — $125 million
2. Avengers: Infinity War — $28.7 million
3. Book Club — $12.5 million
4. Life of the Party — $7.7 million
5. Breaking In — $6.5 million
6. Show Dogs — $6 million
7. Overboard — $4.7 million
8. A Quiet Place — $4 million
9. Rampage — $1.5 million
10. I Feel Pretty — $1.2 million

deadpool2 Weekend Box Office: Deadpool 2 Earns Record Shattering $18.6M in Previews

Ryan Reynolds and 20th Century Fox’s superhero sequel opens two years after the first ‘Deadpool’ hit theaters.

Avengers: Infinity War finally has some competition.

Ryan Reynolds and 20th Century Fox’s summer event pic Deadpool 2 rocketed to a huge $18.6 million in Thursday-night previews from 3,785 theaters, a record for an R-rated pic.

The previous record holder was It ($13.5 million). Prior to It, the first Deadpool had boasted the top preview gross for an R-rated film ($12.7 million). Deadpool, opening in February 2016, went on to debut to a massive $132.4 million, the best launch ever for an R-rated film.

Deadpool 2 — a darling among critics — seems destined to make some history of its own, if the preview number is an indication.

On Friday morning, Deadpool 2 will be playing in a total of 4,349 theaters in North America, where it will easily win the weekend with a debut in the $130 million to $150 million range, ending Infinity War‘s three-week rule.

Overseas, Deadpool 2 is opening in most major markets timed to its U.S. launch — one major exception is China — for a projected foreign debut of $150 million-plus.

Reynolds reprises his role as Deadpool in the follow-up. He produced the sequel and co-wrote the script with his Deadpool collaborators Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick.

Deadpool 2, directed by David Leitch, follows the irreverent superhero as he forms an X-Force posse in hopes of stopping the evil Cable (Josh Brolin). Morena Baccarin, Julian Dennison, Zazie Beetz, T.J. Miller, Brianna Hildebrand and Jack Kesy co-star.

A pair of smaller films also open nationwide this week: Paramount’s female-fronted Book Club and Global Road’s family offering Show Dogs.

Targeting older femmes, director Bill Holderman’s Book Club stars Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen as four friends who decide to read Fifty Shades of Grey — with unintended consequences.

Craig T. Nelson, Andy Garcia and Don Johnson play the love interests. Book Club is tracking to open in the $9 million-$10 million range after grossing a respectable $625,000 in Thursday-evening previews. That’s on par with such pics as Sisters, Overboard and The Intern.

While Avengers: Infinity War will continue its impressive box office run this weekend, perhaps topping $600 million domestically, it will be relinquishing its spot at the top of the domestic charts to yet another Marvel comic book adaptation. Fox’s Deadpool 2 is debuting in a record number of theaters for an R-rated release, not to mention serving as the studio’s widest release ever, and hopes to top the record R-rated debut set by its predecessor two years ago. Also opening this weekend is Paramount’s Book Club, looking to offer older audience members an alternative, while Global Road debuts an alternative of its own in the talking dog family feature Show Dogs.

With Deadpool 2 expected to top this weekend’s box office, it will be the ninth weekend out of the twenty so far this year that a Marvel comic adaptation has served as the #1 film at the weekend box office. Debuting in 4,349 locations, the film is the widest release ever for an R-rated film (topping It‘s 4,103 theaters) and the widest release ever for 20th Century Fox, topping the 4,253 theaters How to Train Your Dragon 2 debuted in in June 2014. The size of the film’s footprint says a lot about the audience and exhibitor appetite for the foul-mouthed antihero as it takes aim at topping the first film’s record-setting $132.4 million opening for an R-rated film.

Industry expectations for the film lean toward an opening anywhere from $130-150 million and those numbers are supported when looking at IMDb page view comparisons leading up to release. Most importantly, Deadpool 2 is neck-and-neck with the first film, which isn’t typically the case for a sequel as follow-ups tend to pace behind their predecessors. Additionally, online ticket retailer Fandango.com reports the sequel is outpacing the original film in advanced ticket sales, all of which has us leaning toward a record breaking opening for an R-rated film with a $138 million opening with room to go much higher.

After three weeks on top of the domestic box office and already pulling in over $1.686 billion worldwide, becoming the fourth largest global release of all-time, Avengers: Infinity War will fall to second place on the domestic charts this weekend. Right now we’re anticipating a drop right around 53%, pulling in around $29 million for the three-day, finishing the weekend with a domestic cume just shy of $600 million domestically after 24 days in release.

Paramount is looking at a third place debut for Book Club, which they acquired North America, France and UK rights for $10 million at AFM last November. Starring Jane Fonda, Mary Steenburgen, Diane Keaton and Candice Bergen, the studio is being conservative with its expectations, anticipating an opening right at $9 million, below our anticipated $10-14 million range for the weekend.

Our expectations are supported by IMDb page view comparisons, which show Book Club outperforming films such as The Big Wedding, The Single Moms Club, Going in Style and Love the Coopers over the two weeks leading up to release while pacing behind Nancy Meyers‘s The Intern. All things considered, our data is leaning heavily toward an opening closer to $12 million, give or take a million or so on either side of that number.

Melissa McCarthy is coming off her worst debut as a film’s lead in Life of the Party, which only managed to narrowly top Breaking In last weekend once actuals were counted. This weekend we’re expecting it to dip 47% for a three-day right around $9.5 million and a fourth place finish.

Rounding out the top five is the aforementioned Breaking In, which came in $1.1 million ahead of estimates last weekend and should dip around 58% or so for a $7.4 million weekend, pushing the film’s domestic cume over $30 million after ten days in release.

Just outside the top five we find the weekend’s final new wide release in Global Road’s Show Dogs. The talking dog feature is the last film to come from the old regime, prior to the Open Road and IM Global merger, and reports have the film tracking to debut in the high single million digits. To look at IMDb page view data we are seeing this one pacing almost exactly like Open Road’s The Nut Job 2 last August, which opened in a massive 4,003 theaters with a dismal $8.3 million. While there haven’t been many family options in theaters as of late, we’re still struggling to see Show Dogs breaking out and currently expecting the film to debut with anywhere from $6-8 million with our forecast, at this time, coming in on the lower end of those expectations.

Magnolia is expanding the release of their documentary RBG into 375 locations (+196) this weekend. The film squeaked into the top ten last weekend and could do the same this weekend. Right now we’re forecasting it will be neck-and-neck with I Feel Pretty for that final spot, both finishing right around $1.5 million for the three-day.

Also be on the lookout for Focus’s documentary Pope Francis – A Man of His Word, which is opening in 346 locations and should manage around $1-1.2 million this weekend, enough to threaten for a spot in the top 15.

In limited release, A24 is releasing the thriller First Reformed into four theaters; Bleecker will debut On Chesil Beach in four locations; and IFC will release the documentary That Summer into one theater.

This weekend’s forecast is directly below. This post will be updated on Friday morning with Thursday night preview results followed by Friday estimates on Saturday morning, and a complete weekend recap on Sunday morning.

  • Deadpool 2 (4,349 theaters) – $138.0 M
  • Avengers: Infinity War (4,002 theaters) – $29.2 M
  • Book Club (2,781 theaters) – $12.0 M
  • Life of the Party (3,656 theaters) – $9.5 M
  • Breaking In (2,537 theaters) – $7.4 M
  • Show Dogs (3,145 theaters) – $6.3 M
  • Overboard (1,820 theaters) – $5.8 M
  • A Quiet Place (2,327 theaters) – $4.0 M
  • Rampage (1,466 theaters) – $1.6 M
  • RBG (375 theaters) – $1.5 M

infinity war 1 Infinity War squashes Life of the Party and Breaking In at the box office

With all due respect to Melissa McCarthy and Gabrielle Union: It’s Thanos’ world, we just live in it.

In its third weekend, Disney and Marvel’s superhero blockbuster Avengers: Infinity War continues to dominate the box office, earning an estimated $61.8 million from 4,474 theaters in the U.S. and Canada while trouncing McCarthy’s new comedy Life of the Party and Union’s new thriller Breaking In.

On Saturday, Infinity War cracked the $500 million mark at the domestic box office, becoming the second-fastest film to do so, and through Sunday it will have grossed about $547.8 million. The movie also bowed in China this weekend, powering a massive $281.3 million international haul. Its worldwide total now stands at about $1.6 billion and ranks fifth all time, behind Avatar, Titanic, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and Jurassic World.

Directed by Joe and Anthony Russo and made for close to $300 million, Infinity War marks the third Avengers film and the 19th installment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It features heroes from across the MCU franchise — including Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man, Chris Evans’ Captain America, Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow, Tom Holland’s Spider-Man, and the Chris Pratt-led Guardians of the Galaxy — and pits them against Thanos (Josh Brolin), an interplanetary warlord trying to wipe out half the life in the universe.

An untitled sequel is already on the calendar for May 3, 2019.Life of the Party Infinity War squashes Life of the Party and Breaking In at the box office

Warner Bros. Pictures

In second place, Warner Bros’. Life of the Party will take in about $18.5 million at 3,656 domestic theaters. That figure is in line with industry projections but falls short of recent McCarthy films Tammy ($21.6 million), The Boss ($23.6 million), and Spy ($29.1 million)

Written by McCarthy and her husband, Ben Falcone, who also directed, Life of the Party centers on a middle-aged divorcée (McCarthy) who returns to college to finish her degree and winds up in class with her daughter (Molly Gordon). The film received lackluster reviews from critics, and audiences gave it a tepid B CinemaScore.

The weekend’s other new wide release, Universal’s Breaking In, is on pace to gross about $16.5 million at 2,537 theaters, good for third place. That’s a solid start for a film that cost a modest $6 million to make.

Directed by James McTeigue (V for Vendetta), the film stars Union as a mother forced to protect her kids when the mansion of her recently deceased dad is invaded by burglars. Reviews have been poor, and moviegoers gave it a B CinemaScore.Breaking In Infinity War squashes Life of the Party and Breaking In at the box office

Paul Sarkis/Universal

Rounding out the top five this weekend are Lionsgate’s rom-com remake Overboard, with about $10.1 million, and Paramount’s silently spooky horror hit A Quiet Place, with about $6.4 million.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 4.8 percent year-to-date. Check out the May 11-13 figures below.

1. Avengers: Infinity War — $61.8 million
2. Life of the Party — $18.5 million
3. Breaking In — $16.5 million
4. Overboard — $10.1 million
5. A Quiet Place — $6.4 million
6. I Feel Pretty — $3.7 million
7. Rampage — $3.4 million
8. Tully — $2.2 million
9. Black Panther — $1.9 million
10. Blockers — $1.1 million

infinity war Avengers: Infinity War dominates box office again with $112.5M second weekend

Avengers: Infinity War rages on.

After delivering the biggest box office opening in history last week, Disney and Marvel’s superhero epic is on track to earn an estimated $112.5 million from 4,474 theaters in the U.S. and Canada this weekend, crushing its competitors while scoring the second-best second weekend ever, not adjusted for inflation. Only Star Wars: The Force Awakens has grossed more in its sophomore frame ($149.2 million), and Infinity War will bump Black Panther ($111.7 million) down to third on that list.

That said, Infinity War’s $112.5 million represents a decline of 56 percent from its opening weekend, which is notably steeper than either The Force Awakens (40 percent) or Black Panther (45 percent), and on par with Warner Bros’. ill-fated Justice League, though better than predecessor Avengers: Age of Ultron (59 percent).

After 10 days in theaters, Infinity War’s domestic tally sits at an estimated $450.8 million. This weekend the movie will add about $162.6 million overseas, for an international total of $713.3 million. Infinity War broke the $1 billion barrier at the worldwide box office Saturday, becoming the fastest film ever to do so, and along the way it has passed fellow superhero hits like Thor: Ragnarok ($854 million), 2002’s Spider-Man ($822 million), and Wonder Woman ($822 million).

Directed by Joe and Anthony Russo and made for close to $300 million, Infinity War marks the third Avengers film and the 19th installment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It features heroes from across the MCU franchise — including Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man, Chris Evans’ Captain America, Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow, Tom Holland’s Spider-Man, and the Chris Pratt-led Guardians of the Galaxy — and pits them against Thanos (Josh Brolin), an interplanetary warlord trying to erase half the life in the universe.

Infinity War has received generally positive reviews from critics, and moviegoers gave it an A CinemaScore. An untitled sequel is already on the calendar for May 3, 2019.overboard Avengers: Infinity War dominates box office again with $112.5M second weekend

MetroGoldwyn Mayer Pictures/Pantelion Films

Unlike last week, when no new major releases went up against against Infinity War, this weekend brought a trio of newcomers: Overboard, a gender-flipped remake of the 1987 rom-com; Tully, a dramedy about motherhood hailing from director Jason Reitman and writer Diablo Cody; and Bad Samaritan, a thriller starring David Tennant.

Buoyed by Eugenio Derbez and Anna Faris, Overboard fared best of the three, grossing an estimated $14.8 million from 1,623 theaters, good for second place. Tully, which stars Charlize Theron, took in about $3.2 million from 1,353, landing in the No. 6 spot, and Bad Samaritan just cracked the top 10 with about $1.8 million from 2,007 theaters.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 5.1 percent year-to-date. Check out the May 4-6 figures below.

1. Avengers: Infinity War — $112.5 million
2. Overboard — $14.8 million
3. A Quiet Place — $7.6 million
4. I Feel Pretty — $4.9 million
5. Rampage — $4.6 million
6. Tully — $3.2 million
7. Black Panther — $3.2 million
8. Truth or Dare — $1.9 million
9. Super Troopers 2 — $1.82 million
10. Bad Samaritan — $1.76 million

infinitywar 1 Avengers: Infinity War scores highest opening ever with $250 million weekend

Thanos is well on his way to subjugating the universe, and he’s definitely got the box office under his thumb.

Disney and Marvel’s superhero epic Avengers: Infinity War is on track to earn an estimated $250 million at 4,474 theaters in the U.S. and Canada this weekend, claiming the highest domestic opening of all time, not adjusted for inflation. Final numbers will roll in Monday, but the movie is poised to dethrone Star Wars: The Force Awakens, which previously held the top spot with $248 million.

The record-breaking haul combines the second-highest domestic Friday in history ($106 million) with the highest Saturday ($83 million) and Sunday ($61 million). With an estimated overseas gross of $380 million, Infinity War also heralds the largest global opening in history, with $630 million. Universal’s The Fate of the Furious previously held the title with $541.9 million. Unlike that film, Infinity War has yet to open in China, the world’s second-largest movie market.

Marvel now boasts six of the top 10 opening weekends of all time, while parent company Disney holds nine of the top 10. The 19 installments of the Marvel Cinematic Universe have combined to earn about $15.4 billion.

Directed by Joe and Anthony Russo, Infinity War marks the third Avengers film and reportedly cost close to $300 million to make. Featuring heroes from across the MCU mega-franchise — including Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man, Chris Evans’ Captain America, Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow, Tom Holland’s Spider-Man, and the Chris Pratt-led Guardians of the Galaxy — the movie pits them against Thanos (Josh Brolin), an interplanetary warlord trying to cull half the life in the universe.

Infinity War has received generally positive reviews from critics, and moviegoers gave it an A CinemaScore. An untitled sequel is already on the calendar for May 3, 2019.

No other films opened in wide release this weekend. The top five was filled out by Paramount’s horror movie A Quiet Place, STX’s comedy I Feel Pretty, Warner Bros’. action movie Rampage, and Marvel’s previous release, Black Panther.

According to ComScore, overall box office is up 3.4 percent year-to-date. Check out the April 27-29 figures below.

1. Avengers: Infinity War — $250 million
2. A Quiet Place — $10.7 million
3. I Feel Pretty — $8.1 million
4. Rampage — $7.1 million
5. Black Panther — $4.4 million
6. Super Troopers 2 — $3.6 million
7. Truth or Dare — $3.2 million
8. Blockers — $2.9 million
9. Ready Player One — $2.4 million
10. Traffik — $1.6 million

infinitywar Box Office: Avengers: Infinity War Heads for Massive $240M Plus U.S. Bow

Chuck Zlotnic/Marvel Studios
‘Avengers: Infinity War’
Disney and Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War is on course for a domestic debut north of $240 million — within shouting distance of Star Wars: The Force Awakens ($248 million), the record holder for biggest opening.

Disney is being more cautious and suggesting a domestic launch in the $225 million-$240 million range. Whatever the case, Infinity War is sure of securing the second-biggest launch of all time, eclipsing Star Wars: The Last Jedi ($220 million).

And globally, Infinity War could eclipse The Fate of the Furious ($541.9 million) to land the biggest box-office launch of all time. That’s without the benefit of China, where it doesn’t land until May 11.

Infinity War has already earned a mighty $178.5 million internationally in its first three days (Wednesday through Friday) for an early global total of $284.5 million.

Friday’s North American gross was $106 million, the second-best single day in history behind the $119.2 million earned by Force Awakens on its first day. Until now, Avengers: Age of Ultron sported the biggest single day for a superhero pic ($84.4 million).

It’s a Marvel superhero bonanza all the way around as Black Panther moves up the chart from No. 8 to No. 5 in its ninth weekend with projected earnings of $3.6 million.

To date, The Avengers ($207.4 million) holds the record for the biggest superhero launch, followed by Black Panther ($202 million). They are the only two superhero titles to have crossed $200 million in their first weekend.

After Force Awakens, the biggest North American openings belong to Star Wars: The Last Jedi ($220 million) and Jurassic World ($208.8 million).

Directed by the Russo brothers, Infinity War reunites the Avengers gang and friends, including Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Captain America (Chris Evans), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), as they join forces with the Guardians of the Galaxy crew to stop the evil intergalactic despot Thanos (Josh Brolin).

The success of Disney and Marvel’s Black Panther could be a huge boost for Infinity War. Black Panther has earned $681 million in North America to become the No. 3 film of all time behind Force Awakens ($936.7 million) and Avatar ($760.5 million). Globally, it has earned $1.325 billion to rest at No. 10 of the all-time biggest earners.

Overseas, Infinity War scored the biggest opening day in a slew of markets, including South Korea — where it has earned $11.4 million in its first two days — Brazil, the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Central America, Chile, Peru, Bolivia and the United Arab Emirates.

From a critical standpoint, reviews on RottenTomatoes currently give the film an 87% rating and on Metacritic the film holds a score of 68. While these are nowhere near the highest marks among films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the reviews seem unlikely to have any major effect on the box office one way or another, but they could suggest a somewhat softer word of mouth than possibly expected.

Overall, while it wouldn’t be surprising to see Infinity War deliver the largest opening weekend of all-time, it seems like a daunting task. When The Force Awakens debuted it was the first new live-action film in the Star Wars franchise in ten years and while Infinity War is being billed as the culmination of ten years of films in the MCU, there have been 18 films released within that franchise over the course of those ten years. Make no mistake, Infinity War will be a monster at this weekend’s box office, and we’re anticipating a performance anywhere from $225-250 million for the three-day, but hitting the higher end of that range may prove difficult.

Internationally, Infinity War began hitting theaters yesterday with $39 million as it debuted in South Korea, France, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand and many others. The film opened at #1 in all markets, including a $6.7 million debut in Australia, the second highest opening day in industry history behind just Force Awakens. The $6.5 million opening in South Korea is the largest opening day in the market ever, along with a $3.9 million opening in both France and Italy and a record $2.7 million debut in the Philippines.

By the end of the weekend the film will have opened in ~72% of the international marketplace, with only key territories such as Russia (May 3) and China (May 11) remaining. Examining the same suite of territories based on today’s exchange rates, The Avengers opened to $189 million while Captain America: Civil War opened to $231 million and Avengers: Age of Ultron opened to $254 million. All told, depending on just how high Infinity War climbs, it could have a shot at becoming only the fourth film to have ever delivered a worldwide opening over $500 million. The major difficulty will be doing hitting that mark without China, a feat accomplished by Force Awakens alone.

A Quiet Place should land in the runner-up position. We’re currently anticipating it will be the only film on the rest of the weekend charts to deliver double digits over the weekend, finishing around $10.3 million over its fourth weekend as it continues its impressive run, looking at a domestic cume just shy of $150 million domestically by the end of the weekend.

Warner Bros. and New Line’s Rampage is likely to feel the effect of Infinity War as we’re expecting a drop around 56%, if not higher, and a third weekend gross right around $9 million, which would put the film’s domestic cume just over $80 million after 17 days in release.

Fourth place should go to Amy Schumer‘s I Feel Pretty and while we’re currently expecting a drop right around 45%, we wouldn’t surprised if this one held on just a bit better and possibly well enough to leap-frog Rampage for a third place finish. Right now we’re expecting a three-day just shy of $9 million, finishing the weekend with a domestic cume over $30 million.

Rounding out the top five is Fox Searchlight’s Super Troopers 2, which we’re expecting to dip over 60% this weekend for a $5+ million three-day. Come the end of the weekend the film’s domestic cume should be just short of $25 million, nearly doubling its $13.5 million production budget after just ten days in release.

This weekend’s forecast is directly below. This post will be updated on Friday morning with Thursday night preview results followed by Friday estimates on Saturday morning, and a complete weekend recap on Sunday morning.

  • Avengers: Infinity War – $230.0 M
  • A Quiet Place – $10.2 M
  • Rampage – $9.0 M
  • I Feel Pretty – $8.9 M
  • Super Troopers 2 – $5.9 M
  • Truth or Dare – $3.7 M
  • Ready Player One – $3.4 M
  • Blockers – $3.4 M
  • Black Panther – $2.9 M
  • Isle Of Dogs – $1.7 M

a quiet place 1 A Quiet Place reclaims box office crown, besting Rampage and I Feel Pretty
Left to right: John Krasinski plays Lee Abbott and Noah Jupe plays Marcus Abbott in A QUIET PLACE, from Paramount Pictures.

A Quiet Place is still making noise at the box office.

In its third weekend in theaters, Paramount and John Krasinski’s nearly dialogue-free horror movie is on track to earn an estimated $22 million from 3,808 theaters in the U.S. and Canada, reclaiming the No. 1 spot from the Dwayne Johnson-led action movie Rampage and holding off Amy Schumer’s new comedy, I Feel Pretty.

Through Sunday, A Quiet Place will have grossed about $132.4 million in North America, plus $74.8 million overseas, for a worldwide total of about $207.2 million. The film, which cost a modest $17 million to make, is now Paramount’s highest-grossing domestic release in nearly two years, since Star Trek Beyond in July 2016 (which earned $158.8 million).

A Quiet Place tells the story of a family living in silence in order to hide from aliens that hunt their prey by sound. Krasinski directed and costars with his wife, Emily Blunt.

Narrowly missing out on the top spot is Warner Bros’. Rampage, taking in an estimated $21 million (from 4,115 theaters). That works out to a drop of just 41 percent from last week’s debut and brings the movie’s domestic total to $66.6 million after 10 days in theaters.

rampage 2 A Quiet Place reclaims box office crown, besting Rampage and I Feel Pretty

Frank Masi/Warner Bros. Pictures

The movie — which stars Johnson as a primatologist and ex-soldier dealing with mutated mega-animals — will need to perform well overseas to be considered a success, and this weekend it will add about $57 million from 61 foreign markets, lifting its international total to about $216.4 million.

Debuting in third place, STX’s I Feel Pretty will gross about $16.2 million, from 3,440 theaters. While that figure is slightly above industry projections, it’s also lower than the $19.5 million managed by Schumer’s Snatched and the $30 million collected by her hit Trainwreck.

Written and directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, I Feel Pretty stars Schumer as an ordinary woman who struggles with her self-image until she hits her head and wakes up feeling beautiful and confident. The movie has received poor reviews from critics, but moviegoers gave it a decent B-plus CinemaScore.

i feel pretty 1 A Quiet Place reclaims box office crown, besting Rampage and I Feel Pretty
Aidy Bryant, Amy Schumer, and Busy Phillips star in I FEEL PRETTY

Another comedy debuting this weekend and garnering a B-plus CinemaScore is Fox’s Super Troopers 2, landing in fourth place with an estimated $14.7 million. The sequel, which hails from the Broken Lizard comedy group and was partially crowdfunded, will far exceed industry projections, which put it in the range of $6 million to $8 million.

Jay Chandrasekhar directed and costars in the movie, which centers on a motley crew of state troopers embroiled in an international border dispute. Reviews have been largely negative.

Blumhouse and Universal’s horror holdover Truth or Dare rounds out the top five with an estimated $7.9 million, while Lionsgate’s crime thriller Traffik, starring Omar Epps and Paula Patton, will open with about $3.9 million — in line with expectations and good for the No. 9 spot.

According to ComScore, overall box office is down 2.2 percent year-to-date. Looking ahead, next week brings the release of Disney and Marvel’s presumptive juggernaut Avengers: Infinity War.

Check out the April 20-22 figures below.

1. A Quiet Place — $22 million
2. Rampage — $21 million
3. I Feel Pretty — $16.2 million
4. Super Troopers 2 — $14.7 million
5. Truth or Dare — $7.9 million
6. Ready Player One — $7.5 million
7. Blockers — $7 million
8. Black Panther — $4.6 million
9. Traffik — $3.9 million
10. Isle of Dogs — $3.4 million

i feel pretty and super troopers 2 Weekend Box Office: I Feel Pretty Loses to Super Troopers 2 on Friday

Courtesy of STXfilms; Jon Pack/Commander Softpants
‘I Feel Pretty,’ ‘Super Troopers 2’

‘I Feel Pretty’ stars Amy Schumer in her first PG-13 comedy.

Audiences may already be looking ahead to Avengers: Infinity War, but this weekend could feature an interesting battle among the top three. While we’re expecting A Quiet Place to return to the weekend’s #1 spot, the race could be a little closer should Rampage hold on better than expected or if Amy Schumer‘s new comedy I Feel Pretty outperforms expectations.

In a surprise twist, Fox Searchlight’s Super Troopers 2 zoomed past Amy Schumer’s new comedy, I Feel Pretty, to win the Friday box-office race with $7.9 million from 2,038 cinemas. I Feel Pretty grossed $6.3 million from 3,440 locations.

Nevertheless, it’s still not clear how the full weekend will play out. Most estimates show A Quiet Place winning the weekend with $20 million or more from 3,808 theaters — an impressive feat considering John Krasinski’s high-concept horror film is in its third weekend.

I Feel Pretty hopes to overtake Dwayne Johnson’s Rampage, now in its sophomore outing, and come in No. 2 with $18 million (Rampage had hoped to win the weekend).That’s ahead of prerelease tracking, which had suggested a $13 million-$15 million debut for I Feel Pretty. Many box-office observers are predicting that Super Troopers 2, despite winning Friday, will be front-loaded and hence place No. 4 with $15 million-$16 million.

STX always believed there was room for upside if femmes turned out in force to watch Schumer in her latest turn on the big screen. I Feel Pretty is rated PG-13, compared with a more restrictive R for Trainwreck (2015) and Snatched (2017), which debuted to $30.1 million and $19.5 million, respectively.

Voltage financed the $32 million film, with STX acquiring U.S. rights for $15 million.

In the movie, directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, Schumer plays a woman who believes she looks like a supermodel after bumping her head in a spinning class. The movie’s current score on Rotten Tomatoes is an unenthusiastic 35 percent, while the film earned a B+ CinemaScore from audences. I Feel Pretty co-stars Michelle Williams, Rory Scovel, Emily Ratajkowski, Aidy Bryant, Busy Philipps, Tom Hopper, Naomi Campbell and Lauren Hutton.

Schumer has responded to criticism from some on social media that the movie’s trailer encouraged body shaming by saying that her character suffers from low self-esteem and that I Feel Pretty sends a positive message. I Feel Pretty’s Friday gross was ahead of the $5 million earned by Snatched.

Fox Searchlight’s Super Troopers 2 — a follow-up to the 2002 cult hit — is doing more than double the business prerelease tracking suggested it would.

The sequel was written by and stars the Broken Lizard comedy troupe; Jay Chandrasekhar, Brian Cox, Kevin Heffernan, Steve Leme, Paul Soter and Erik Stolhanske. The first film launched to $6.2 million domestically.

This time out, the oddball troopers attempt to resolve an international border dispute between the U.S. and Canada. The movie’s Rotten Tomatoes score is presently 33 percent, compared with the first film’s 35 percent, and it earned a B+ CinemaScore from audiences. Super Troopers 2 was financed by a crowd-funding campaign that raised a hearty $4.4 million.

Codeblack’s and Lionsgate’s thriller Traffik, the weekend’s third new offering, is pacing to bow to less than $4 million for a 9th place finish. Directed by Deon Taylor, the R-rated pic revolves around a couple (Paula Patton and Omar Epps) who are terrorized by a biker gang at a remote country getaway. Traffik is playing in 1,046 theaters.

Back in the top five, Universal and Blumhouse’s Truth or Dare is projected to place No. 4 with $7.7 million for a 10-day domestic total of $30.2 million.

Warner Bros. and Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One and Unviersal’s Blockers are in a close race for No. 5 with an estimated $7 million each.

Warners announced Saturday that Ready Player One has crossed the $500 million mark globally, only the second Hollywood film of the year to do so behind Black Panther. It is also the first film Spielberg has directed to earn north of $500 million since Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull ($786.6 million) in 2008.

This weekend’s forecast is directly below. This post will be updated on Friday morning with Thursday night preview results followed by Friday estimates on Saturday morning, and a complete weekend recap on Sunday morning.

  • A Quiet Place (3,808 theaters) – $21.1 M
  • Rampage (4,115 theaters) – $17.2 M
  • I Feel Pretty (3,440 theaters) – $15.0 M
  • Truth or Dare (3,068 theaters) – $7.5 M
  • Ready Player One (3,208 theaters) – $7.1 M
  • Blockers (3,134 theaters) – $6.5 M
  • Super Troopers 2 (2,038 theaters) – $6.0 M
  • Black Panther (1,930 theaters) – $3.8 M
  • Isle Of Dogs (1,947 theaters) – $3.6 M
  • Traffik (1,046 theaters) – $3.5 M

rampage 1 Rampage Has One Disastrous Problem

Courtesy of Warner Bros.
[This story contains spoilers for Rampage]

This weekend’s Rampage wants to be two types of blockbusters: a King Kong-like monster movie and a Roland Emmerich-esque disaster flick, with Dwayne Johnson at the center of it all.

But this video game adaptation does not have the ability to satisfy these impulses in a way that’s tonally consistent, which distracts from its promise of mindless thrills. Despite the Rampage arcade cabinets being constantly visible in its villains’ headquarters, director Brad Peyton’s live-action adaptation comes off as too emotionally glib and mean-spirited, even for a mega-budget B-movie.

The film, written by Ryan Engle, Carlton Cuse, Ryan J. Condal and Adam Sztykiel, has a big albino gorilla in the room named George, who embodies the story’s schizophrenic identity to evoke some of the cartoonish game but also make a spectacle out of destruction. Sometimes George is goofy, like when introduced as a playful, sarcastic zoo animal with an emotional bond to the human-averse primatologist Davis (Johnson), which is tonally matched by scenes where hammy villains played by Malin Akerman and Jake Lacy talk about their scheme to genetically edit animals with the same threatening nature of Boris and Natasha from Rocky & Bullwinkle. But George is also shown to have the potential for great violence as well, after a pathogen genetically modifies him to grow in size, his rage causing a plane full of people to crash and then a city to be destroyed, as mirrored by jarringly dark scene where a modified super-wolf reduces Joe Manganiello into splattered red corn syrup. With distinct scenes playing out like they came from completely different movies, Rampage could have used a great deal of genetic editing itself.

Because the script most of all needs to show George acting monstrously with a fellow mega-wolf and mega-crocodile to be on brand with the Bally/Midway arcade staple (instead of possibly having George always be a monster-fighter or something similar), Rampage treats George’s evil as an on-and-off switch, even alleging the city’s chaos would have been worse without him. Grounded in a human story as an animal buddy to Davis, the audience is expected to sympathize with George unquestionably as he loses control of his inhibitions, then root for him as he topples skyscrapers and tears up major streets along with two other villainous monsters, and then find him honorable when paired up with Johnson to fight an equally destructive monster. The viewer can’t escape from the script’s indifference in mashing a human-focused story with a video game narrative that’s meant to jokingly celebrates chaos. The result is a moral passivity that dulls the city-smashing spectacle when it should explode like many Chicago buildings do. As the city is attacked, innocent people die and a sense of tonal intent is lost. Peyton expects you to take a vacation from the human factor established in so many other scenes.

Rampage uses the mutation aspect of the game to create a Jekyll and Hyde partner for Johnson, but it disregards the inherent gray areas that should come with a live-action version, now that the chaos is not told from the monsters’ POV, as it is in the game. As goofy as Rampage may be, Peyton’s film fails in the very basic element of using character to establish tone, particularly when you consider two films that clearly influenced Rampage — previous Warner Bros. projects Godzilla and Kong: Skull Island. Both of those films were able to get the mega destruction they desired, and let the monsters show their angry side, but they ultimately fortified their actions as those of complicated anti-heroes — in Godzilla, the movie concludes with the headline “Savior of our city?” and in Kong: Skull Island, it is revealed that Kong, despite killing humans in a gruesome fashion throughout, has been a protector of the island all along. Rampage only cares about George to the capacity that he can cause death and destruction, but also be a hero when needed.

Rampage only settles in by its final rumble, becoming good monster and good Rock vs. a truly bad monster, among rubble in which no other humans can be seen. It is a great set-piece, with Johnson acting as if this were his own Life of Pi. But after it’s over, Rampage can’t resist touting its shallow idea of heroism and justice, as it shows people emerging from the rubble in slow motion, as if Davis and George had stopped another 9/11. It’s the cheapest bow for a story like this, as if Rampage admits that it does not want to deal with a fundamental character idea of right and wrong, and just sweep all of George’s casualties under the rubble.

This marks the third collaboration between Johnson and Peyton, the latter who follows the Roland Emmerich philosophy of disaster movies, as seen in the likes of Emmerich’s The Day After Tomorrow and 2012 — only the lives of the main characters matter, even when hundreds of thousands or millions of people are clearly dying within the story. It’s an often fruitful angle for a B-movie, given how Peyton’s predecessors have made spectacle out of it decades, but there’s a very rotten idea of humanism at the core of Peyton’s two disaster stories, this and 2015’s San Andreas. In their previous collaboration, Johnson played a Los Angeles Fire Department rescue pilot, who is rarely shown using those skills, despite the many helpless people he must have passed by while bounding through an apocalyptic California. As with this film, the rampaging takes a non-cartoonish, mean-spirited toll on the city and its civilians, and fellow human beings are only shown when they can be killed or used for emotional moments. In both movies, the disaster spectacle is used as an excuse for a cold, no-stakes idea of humanity.

Peyton’s Emmerich-esque take in Rampage of goofy monsters in an environment of skyscrapers and thousands of people becomes all the more less enjoyable when they are tearing up Chicago in a fashion that has rightfully earned connections to 9/11 by various film critics, creating a needlessly warped idea of playtime. Rampage awkwardly evolves into a disaster movie, and it becomes distracting that the story is so cynical about the purpose of monsters, humans and disaster films. Rampage may boast the same mindset of a game that treats people like tiny figures ready to be crushed or stomped or eaten, but Peyton’s indifference to a stable tone makes the spectacle incredibly sobering, not fun.

rampage Weekend Box Office: Rampage Beats A Quiet Place After All With $34.5M

Courtesy of Warner Bros.
‘Rampage’
On Friday afternoon, New Line’s Rampage appeared to be dropping like a rock at the U.S. box office, with first projections suggesting the big-budget movie might not earn much more than $28 million in its launch.

But thanks to the star power of Dwayne Johnson, Rampage made something of a recovery, opening to $34.5 million from 4,101 theaters, one of the best showings ever for a video game adaptation and enough to win the weekend ahead of holdover horror sensation A Quiet Place. That was still behind expectations, however. Heading into the weekend, tracking showed Rampage launching to $35 million to $40 million, compared to $54 million for Johnson’s San Andreas two years ago.

Overseas, Rampage roared loudly in China, biting off $55 million for a foreign debut of $114.1 million and solid global start of $148.6 million. The movie, costing at least $120 million to make before marketing, will need to have strong legs to earn its money back.

One formidable challenge is Avengers: Infinity War, which opens April 2. Rampage had been slotted to open on April 20, but moved up its release when Infinity War relocated. Rampage‘s new date meant that it debuted only two weeks after Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One, likewise from Warner Bros.

Ready Player One, which gave up most Imax screens to Rampage, fell 54 percent over the weekend to $11.2 million for a domestic tally of $114.6 million. Ready Player One remains a force overseas, where it took in $33.8 million for a foreign cume of $360.2 million and a worldwide tally of $474.8 million.

In Rampage, Johnson plays a primatologist whose beloved pal, an albino gorilla, is transformed into a giant menace as the result of a genetic experiment (there’s also a wolf and a crocodile involved). The movie comes on the heels of the blockbuster success of Johnson starrer Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, which has grossed $950.9 million at the global box office after debuting to $36.2 million domestically.

Jumanji, like other Johnson films, enjoyed a huge multiple. New Line is hopeful Rampage , nabbing an A- CinemaScore, will follow the same course, particularly if it attracts families, who made up 28 percent of the opening weekend audience, according to comScore. Overall, the film is skewing male (55 percent) and playing to an ethnically diverse audience. Caucasians made up 43 percent of all ticket buyers, followed by Hispanics (22 percent), African-Americans (19 percent) and Asians/other (16 percent).

“Dwayne Johnson is the real deal. He’s a closer,” says Warners distribution chief Jeff Goldstein.

Paramount’s high-concept horror film A Quiet Place continued to defy expectations in its sophomore outing, earning $32.6 million for a domestic total just shy of $100 million at $99.6 million. The movie fell a scant 35 percent.

A Quiet Place wasn’t the only horror pic to do scary business, thanks to a strong turnout among younger moviegoers.

Truth or Dare, the latest microbudget collaboration from Universal and Blumhouse, opened to a strong $19.2 million in the U.S. The supernatural thriller — which hit theaters on Friday the 13th — revolves around a group of spring breakers who play an innocent game of Truth or Dare that turns deadly. Directed by Jeff Wadlow, the film stars Lucy Hale and Tyler Posey.

Truth or Dare placed No. 3, followed by Ready Player One. Universal’s R-rated comedy Blockers rounded out the top five with $10.3 million for a tepid 10-day domestic cume of $36.9 million.

Among other new offerings, the animated indie film Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero couldn’t find its stride, opening to just $1.1 million from 1,633 theaters.

At the specialty box office, Bleecker Street’s Middle East political thriller Beirut, starring Jon Hamm and Rosamund Pike, grossed $1.7 million from 754 theaters for a five-day debut of $2.2 million (it opened on Wednesday). Previously titled High Wire Act, the film centers on a top U.S. diplomat (Hamm) who leaves Lebanon in the 1970s after his wife is killed. Bard Anderson directed from a script by Tony Gilroy (Michael Clayton, The Bourne Legacy).

Chloe Zhao’s The Rider debuted to $45,268 from three theaters for a screen average of $15,089. From Sony Pictures Classics, the modern-day Western made its debut at Cannes last year.

And Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs moved up to No. 7 as it expanded into a total of 1,939 theaters. The Fox Searchlight film earned $5 million for a domestic tally of $18.5 million.

rampage ver2 Rampage (2018) Movie Trailer #2Rampage (2018) Movie Trailer #2
Watch the Trailer of this Movie:

US Release Date: April 20, 2018
Starring: Dwayne Johnson, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Malin Akerman
Directed By: Brad Peyton
Synopsis: Based on the classic 1980s video game featuring apes and monsters destroying cities.



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